Posts Tagged ‘Checkerboard’

Rite of Spring

April 8, 2019

Everyone has been asking how it got to be April already. Count me in that group. Didn’t I just report my January progress last week? I feel like I haven’t done much but I’ve been really busy doing it. Saturday I completed that annual requirement of filing income taxes. I was quite agitated by the time that was done. The Republicans’ so-called tax cut resulted in an increase in my taxes of $4500 over 2017. Yikes! I headed to the studio to calm down.

A couple of years ago I matched my floral fabrics with greens and cut strips for 16-patch blocks. It doesn’t pay to do anything but simple sewing when I’m upset so I got out the bin to finish up the blocks. There are enough blocks for many quilts. Here’s the result. These are just plopped on the way as I finished pressing them. They’re not sewn to each other or arranged or anything like that. I was much calmer after finishing these.

 

I took the previously finished blocks out of the bin and discovered that stack wasn’t just finished blocks.

 

The pile on the right is the finished blocks. The pile on the left is the blocks waiting to be completed. Oy vey! Here’s what came out of that pile on Sunday.

 

I was thinking that there were lots more finished blocks so I went digging in the UFO closet. Found this bin of completed blocks. Now, that’s more like it.

 

 

Now that ALL the blocks are finished and won’t fit into one bin, it’s time to sort them into the blocks for my quilt (all my favorite blocks, of course) and the blocks for donation quilts.

Here are random shots of other things I’ve done since the early February report.

 

First block for Baltimore Garden class still in progress. For the March class we were supposed to have the block ready for the flowers. The block is ready to have the first part of one of the flowers stitched. I got a start on the freezer paper pieces for our April class homework. I don’t think I’m going to be ready to sew a bird’s eye by class time.

 

4-patches from 1.5″ squares.

I laid out blocks I made a couple of years ago at retreat. I laid them out at retreat and had one left over. Someone said I had to make more to finish another row. So, I brought it home and made the blocks but it sat. I neglected to take a photo of it on the design wall. It’s now packed up to go to retreat next month for block assembly. I’ll save the border work till I get home from retreat.

 

4-patches made from the leftovers of the blocks I forgot to take a picture of.

 

Some string blocks.

 

More string blocks.

 

 

 

 

 

Blocks for the checkerboard top.

 

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Laid out the Sweet Poison blocks and trimmed them to size.

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Made some pink 16-patch blocks.

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Got the borders on Mocha Meringue and made the back with leftovers and some added fabric from stash.

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Assembled these 9-patch blocks and added a border. This started with already made blocks from the freebie table at guild. I made a flannel back for it so it’s ready for the quilter.

 

Went to Target this morning and got some Command picture hanging strips so I could get my memo boards up. This door is at the bottom of the stairs so I will see it first thing when I go into the studio. My Target is being renovated so everything has been moved around. While I was looking for what I needed, I found those cute hexagon wood magnets and the pins with hooks. Do I need the hooks? Beats me but now I have them. I must have dry erase markers somewhere but Target had these neat ones that have a magnet and eraser built in. The dry erase boards are magnetic so that’s perfect. I’ve already filled up the bottom board with things that are pending just laying around the studio waiting for a turn. The top board contains the tasks that need to be done next. If the boards stay stuck to the door I’ll be a happy camper. In the process I discovered that the door doesn’t latch securely so pressing on it pushes it open even if it is closed. Have to get my handyman on that next time he’s here.

Things I don’t have pictures of: February snowman is fused. March snowman is ready for binding and needs the coal pieces added. Haven’t started April and it looks like maybe it’s going to get skipped for now.

Clown school: I made a list in January of tasks to do each month and lost it. I did get the background pieced. That was so hard. Cut 2 pieces of fabric and sew them together. Now I need large pieces of fusible web. I think I bought a roll of the long stuff so I need to find it and see if it’s big enough.

Ladies of the Sea: I did get the final ship done. Discovered that I used two stands of floss for some of the embroidery then got confused and switched to one strand. I have to go back and redo about 3 bits on one of the sails so they all match. Polly thought I could leave the big sail as it is since it has two rows of tell-tails. I realize y’all have no idea what I’m talking about but it’ll show up here one day.

Looks like I’ve done more than I thought. Now that the memo board is up I can make notes about what I’ve done when leaving the studio.

 

 

January Projects

February 13, 2019

We have a bunch of geese that commute to the farm near my house every morning. Every night they fly back to their night time hangout. Their flight path is right over my house so we hear them every morning and evening.

A couple of weeks ago we had extremely cold temperatures for this area thanks to the Polar Vortex. This pond where the geese like to hang out froze over. I decided to stop and take a picture last week. I was surprised to see that the geese are sitting and standing on ice. When they’re not on the pond, they’re in the fields looking for food. The day I took the picture the temp got up to the low 70s. The next day it was 20 degrees cooler. In one week our temperatures went from the teens to the 70s. Is it any wonder I have four coats of different weights hanging on the hook by the garage door?

I realized last week that just as Pigpen goes around with a cloud of dirt around him, I leave a trail of stuff when I’m working on certain projects, particularly applique. Here’s my dining table while working on my last Ladies of the Sea ship. There was also a nest of stuff next to me on the couch.

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Yes, that’s the Christmas tree on the right. A couple of friends came over and we moved the tree into it’s new storage bag with rolling stand and wheeled it out into the garage where it will live. One hitch in the git-a-long was that the tree is taller than the doorway. We managed.

Look at that mess on the table! I try to be neat but sometimes it just doesn’t work. I did get the block finished by Grad School class on Monday. That was the goal for this ongoing bucket list project.

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Unfortunately, when I washed the block, the lighter tan ultrasuede used for the masts bled. See the tan smudges next to the left edges of the sails? I’m going to try Vicki Welsh’s advice and pray that it works. I’ve used this piece of ultrasuede on other blocks but it looks like they are ones that haven’t been washed yet.

New bucket list project for this year was Snowmen Will Melt Your Heart by Curtis Boehringer. The January block is Building a Snowman. The pattern showed it done in black, white and gray. Yuck. January is bad enough without a black, white and gray wall-hanging. One of the benefits of having a large stash is that I got this from it:

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Is this not adorable? The backgrounds are bluer in person than they are showing on my monitor. I doubt the photo shows that the black for the hats is a sparkle fabric. Looks like little ice crystals all over the hat. I used a string of asterisks stitch that look like snowflakes to stitch the snowmen. The rest of the pieces were topstitched. All edges were turned under before stitching.

I was planning to have Kim quilt this but there isn’t really much quilting space for her artistry. I guess I need to suck it up and do this one myself – just stitch around the appliques. Someone who likes to embellish would have a great time with those snowflakes on the background of the center piece. Unfortunately, that someone isn’t me. But, you never know. Stranger things have happened. And, Hell did freeze over (Hell, Michigan). Each block is supposed to have the name of the month embroidered on. January, broken into three sections, would be to the left of the big snowmen. Ending with the Y just above the pieces of coal that I see ended up on the points of the snowflake. Looks a little weird but it’s not going to change. Anyway, this also was finished for Monday’s meeting. So far, so good.

The second new bucket list project is Clown School. My goal for January was to acquire the rest of the fabric needed. As large as my stash is, it doesn’t have a lot of pieces over a half yard. And, we’re supposed to buy stuff to support the store that lets us meet there. And, they give us a 15% discount on Grad School days. I did accomplish the goal for this project. Yay! The remaining fabrics, just black and white, I believe, will come from stash. That’s the plan, anyway.

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The third new bucket list project is Baltimore Garden. This is a long term project so you’re not going to be seeing a block every month. We had our first class at the end of January. Our assignment for the February class is to prepare a block to be ready to sew. I’m still searching for the perfect fabric for the flowers. I have a 1.5″ strip of a probably discontinued Fairy Frost that would work very well I think. A road trip with Polly and Vera is planned. I’ve already bought two possibilities for the flowers. I’ll probably end up with 20 yards of fabric before I’m happy. I also need binding for a large queen quilt that is a gift to my BFF from junior high school. I’d like to use a Fairy Frost for that. Polly is still dithering on sashing and borders for Ladies of the Sea. If we can’t find what we want at Webfabrics in Purcellville, Va, it probably doesn’t exist.

The Good Fortune mystery fell by the wayside in mid-December when I took my machines for maintenance while I was gone for the holidays. My Janome 9400 stopped winding bobbins the night before I took it in. I had not had good experiences with this machine ever since I got it mid-2016. After talking to the Janome regional rep at a show last June, I took the machine up to Glory Bee’s in Fallston, MD. I wrote up my tale of woe so whoever looked at the machine would know my history with it and my dealer’s so-called technician. Gloria, the owner, spent over an hour with me when I picked up the machine, making sure I knew certain things and showing me some features she likes. She said the tech spent quite a bit of time working on it. It now sews a straight seam with correct tension using normal thread. Before, I had to change the tension before sewing every single time. It’s like having a brand new machine. If I can forget the bad times, I might actually come to like this machine.

I was able to sew clues 5, 6, and half of clue 7.

In the grad school class, we celebrated Eleanor’s 90th birthday. Mimi had each of us make a block, then she and Kim finished the quilt we presented to Eleanor. Isn’t Kim’s quilting gorgeous! My block is third row down, second from left.

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I started going to my guild’s retreats two years ago. When I tried to sign up for this year, I was too late – it was full. Oh, no! Got word the day before my birthday that a space has opened up. Yay! Great present! Now I need to see if my roommate from the last two years is going and wants to room together. The spring retreat doesn’t offer single rooms.

The last of the current checkerboard blocks were made. Time to sew them up into a quilt or two or three.

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I met all my January goals. Small goals help with that. Can/will I stay on track in February and meet my goals for the next Grad School meeting? We’ll have to wait and see.

Thanks for visiting. I’d love to read your comments.

Good Fortune: Clue 4

December 17, 2018

This week Bonnie asked us to do string piecing. I love string piecing but I don’t have much in the way of orange strings. I need orange strings because I want to do Bonnie’s pumpkin quilt. I decided to go with the  strip piecing option for the mystery quilt. As I cut each fabric with my Stripology ruler I used the straightening cut as an opportunity to cut strings for the pumpkin quilt. I also cut 1.5″, 2″ and 2.5″ strips for my strip stash. I have a new addition to my fabric room for storing these. More about that in a future post.

In order to get a scrappier look I cut them into short strips to get 1-2 segments from each strip set.

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The strips are laid out, ready to combine into strip sets. I think I should be able to get strip sets that are all different combinations, theoretically. However, I suck at being random. I got what I got so it will have to do.

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All done. This was a very quick clue to make. I cut the strips Friday afternoon and finished sewing mid-afternoon on Saturday.

I wasn’t ready to stop sewing Saturday after I finished the clue so I put the borders on this string quilt. I told you I like doing string piecing. I’m calling this one String Weaver.

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I also finished the last of the Sweet Poison blocks. They are the ones on the left. The ones on the right were done earlier but not shown yet. Now that project is ready for layout.

Along the way these leader/enders were sewn.

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As well as these 16-patch blocks.

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That’s the end of my machine sewing for the year. My two Janome machines are going in for maintenance and repair on Monday. That means the next time I can work on a mystery clue is January. I hope she doesn’t do a rapid finish this year. I’d like to catch up before I know what the final result looks like.

This week will be spent getting ready for the holidays. If I find time maybe I can make myself work on one of the Ladies of the Sea blocks.

Thanks for visiting. I’d love for you to leave a comment.

Visit Bonnie Hunter’s blog to see what other mystery quilt makers are sharing.

Back to Ringo Lake

October 26, 2018

Some time ago I sat down and designed my back for On Ringo Lake. For Bonnie’s mystery quilts, my habit is to blow up a block from the front to make the back. I was so pleased that it went so smoothly. I cut the first pieces, then had to set it aside for other obligations. I was excited to get back to making the back today.

My draft of the block with measurements.

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My cutting list:

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I finished cutting the pieces and put them on the design wall.

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It went together very smoothly. Everything fit perfectly and it was sewn in no time. I was puzzled that it was so much smaller than I expected. On Ringo Lake is a big quilt. This block was supposed to fill most of the back expect for slab borders around the four sides.

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My sketch and numbers for the back:

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The numbers are all accurate except for the ones in the sketch. The correct numbers are the size of the quilt top, rather than the back. Somehow the block that I expected to be 69″ was only 39″. How did that happen? It looks like I somehow expected  3 x 13 to result in a 69″ block. Needless to say, it doesn’t. The block turned out 39″ finished as one would expect for a 9 patch where each square is 13″. I have no idea what I was thinking.

Would you believe I have a math minor? That’s pretty much a joke because I wasn’t particularly interested in math. Somehow I got to my senior year in college without thinking about a minor and discovered that I needed as many hours for a minor as a major. Something I didn’t have and couldn’t get before graduation. The solution was to find two subjects where the hours added up and go for a split minor. That’s how I got a minor in math.

So, here I am with a block that’s 30″ smaller than expected. Sigh. But, no lasting harm done. I just have to make more borders to fill out the size needed for the back. It might be more interesting that way.

I also made a couple more Sweet Poison (modified Kwik Krazy) blocks.

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And more leader/ender pieces.

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T for Two off to the quilter

October 25, 2018

I finally got the borders on T for Two and took it to the long-arm quilter this afternoon. Yeah!

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T for Two at guild for show and tell. I couldn’t get the whole thing in the picture because there was a table in front of it. I didn’t feel like making the effort to put it up on my design wall at home at this point. I’ll take proper pictures when it is finished.

My original thought for the back of this quilt was to reflect Bill’s interest in the Civil War and Becky’s love of books. When I laid out the fabric, I realized that idea wasn’t appropriate for a bed quilt. I realized it would be best to have Becky pick out a fabric she loved for the back so she can use the quilt either side up.

When I looked at assembling the back, I decided that I had to match the print as best I could. Pretty good job, even if I do say so myself. It’s hard to see from the picture but it’s a very delicate metallic filigree design.

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Here’s how I matched the print. It takes patience but wasn’t at all difficult.

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I decided the match point should be the center spine of the design. I folded one of the fabrics at the chosen point closest to the selvage and pressed it.

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Then I laid the fold on top of the second piece of fabric, matching the print as best I could. I used Easy Piecing seam align glue to hold the fabrics together. It worked very well for this and for matching the border print pieces on the front of the quilt.

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I unfolded the top piece and carefully carried the fabric to the machine. The glue isn’t permanent so will pull apart if much pressure is put on it – this is by design. I then stitched in the crease of the fold. Toward the bottom of the picture you can see that the fabric isn’t fully opened to show the crease. That is because the glue went through. I just gently pulled it away to reveal the crease. After the seam was sewn I trimmed it to .5″ seam allowance, pulled the seam allowances apart and pressed open. After the 3 panels were sewn together, I trimmed the top and bottom so they were even (I hope).

Now I have to figure out what to use for binding. I’d like to find something that works for both sides but may end up making a two color binding.

While I was dragging my feet on the borders I accomplished these items.

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Checkerboard leader/ender. Some sets of four 4-patches, some 4-patches and some twosies ready to be 4-patches.

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16 more blocks for Sweet Poison. Pattern is Kwik Krazy and Kwik Krazy Too, modified to add leading strips.

My friend Caren said she’d smack me if I gave this quilt a statement name. Tough. Sugar and carbs (sugar in disguise) are poison so Sweet Poison it is – unless I come up with something I like better. While I was working on these blocks the potato chip fabric looked so good I could practically taste them. I resisted for a while but finally succumbed and bought a bag of chips to get that craving out of my system.

Now that T for Two is off my plate for a while, the world is my oyster. I can work on anything I want without feeling guilty. Yes! I have so many things to work on I almost can’t decide where to start. I’ll keep on with Sweet Poison until the blocks are finished but switch off to other items. I’d like to get On Ringo lake to the quilter before the next mystery starts the day after Thanksgiving.

Oops, I did it again!

October 16, 2018

What did I do? Let’s leave that for later.

Here’s the view from my driveway yesterday. They’ve started construction on the final group in my development which happens to be directly across the street from me. The next few months are going to be even more annoying than the last few since they’ve run out of space to store their supplies. These are the forms for the concrete walls. They poured the footers last week.

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I expect to see this again tomorrow. The many, many concrete trucks line up along the street and one by one hook up to the red device which is a crane sort of thing to reach all the way to the back of the lots. It pumps the concrete into the forms.

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In the meantime, here’s what’s been going on lately. I went to my guild’s 3-day fall retreat at Pecometh in Centreville, MD.

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Maria, my long-arm quilter, showing what she did during the retreat.

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This pile is not everything Maria made during the retreat. We decided her Indian name is “Sews Like Wind”.

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Pat is testing the fit of the apron she made on one of the other attendees.

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I caught this beauty resting on the sidewalk while I took a break from the sewing room.

 

The American Quilt Study Group had it’s annual seminar in Bethesda, MD. I volunteered at the bed turning where I saw this stunning quilt.

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Antique quilt with crumb pieced border

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Close-up of crumb pieced border. More colorful than it appears from a distance.

I got there early so got to see a lot of the quilts while I helped lay them out on the tables. There were 6 different tables. I neglected to count how many quilts were on each table. The quilts are laid one on top of the next. As the presenter finished talking about the current quilt, the helpers folded it over to stack on top of the others at the end of the table. The next time through the quilts were unfolded from the pile and talked about until all the quilts were laying flat. Repeat that process until the end of the event.

Here are some of the botanical quilts that caught my eye.

I also served as quilt police in the antique quilts made in Maryland exhibit. No, not that quilt police. This was the real quilt police to make sure none of the quilts went walkabout, keep people from touching them, no photos of the prohibited ones, etc. The pictures of these are on my camera and I haven’t downloaded them yet so no photos of them here. If you want to see some, go to Barbara Brackman’s blog.

On the home front, I finally finished this block from Anna’s Blue Baskets/Jo’s Floral Album. I don’t like this block at all. Don’t know if it’s the design, my fabric choices or both. Whatever.

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The shipyard work stoppage ended and I got the embroidery done on The Golden Hind. That rigging was a pain in my be-Hind. I haven’t done the inking on any of the ship blocks yet. Polly was threatening to have me keel-hauled if the shipyard work stoppage continued.

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The Golden Hind from Ladies of the Sea by Sue Garman.

Got the first border on T for Two.

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While I was dragging my feet on the borders for T for Two, I got the following done.

 

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On Ringo Lake. I still want to add a 3″ aqua/turquoise border to finish it off.

Leader/ender 4-patches.

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Triangle gatherings 7-10, probably not in that order.

So, what was the title of this post referring to? I started yet another project. I have a whole closet full of UFOs/WIPs. The last things I need is another project. In my defense, there will be some things that just need borders and/or backs moving to the long-arm quilter as soon as I get the remaining borders on T for Two.

I picked up Kwik Krazy and Kwik Krazy Too patterns from my guild freebie table a few years ago. They are stack and slice crazy quilt blocks. I really enjoy that type of piecing. I decided to do a test block to see if it would work if I inserted a 1″ unfinished strip between the pieces for a stained glass look. Turned out surprisingly nice considering I just grabbed fairly random scraps.

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Kwik Krazy test block.

I have an astounding collecting of food fabrics. I cut 36 squares from high-carb food fabrics (no repeats, of course) to make 18 blocks from each of the two patterns. I’m using unwrapped chocolate bars for the lead strips. Had to ask my friend Google if I could get more of that since I only had a half yard and it’s a few years old. I have 4 yards coming. Hope I calculated correctly so I have enough for the blocks, sashing between the blocks and binding. I’ve made the first 7 blocks. Discovered that I forgot to make sure all the fabrics were right side up before I sliced the squares up. So far, one fabric was upside down so I have to cut new pieces as I go since I started with a fat quarter and don’t have enough to cut as a square.

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Blocks from Kwik Krazy Too. The blocks haven’t been trimmed to size yet.

Writing this post was yet another way to avoid putting the next border on T for Two or putting things away so the cleaners can clean tomorrow. Procrastination should be my middle name. Sigh. Hopefully I’ll feel guilty enough soon to go downstairs and cut the strips for the next border.

They’re Coming to Take Me Away, Ha-Haaa!

September 27, 2018

If you’re of a certain age, you might remember the song with this refrain:

And They’re coming to take me away Ha Ha
They’re coming to take me away ho ho he he ha ha
to the funny farm where life is beautiful all the time, and I’ll be happy to see those nice young men in their clean white coats
and they’re coming to take me away ha ha

I’ve been told before that I’m nuts, so why are they coming to take me away this time? I saved a bunch of bonus triangles from one of the Bonnie Hunter mysteries (Allietare, I think) and started making the Triangle Gatherings blocks, a free sew-along in 2017, from Primitive Gatherings. The free blocks are no longer available. I believe they’re working on a book or pattern or something.

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That green square is 2.5″. The blocks are made with 16 1.25″ (0.75″ finished) half-square triangle squares. If I’ve done the math correctly, the blocks finish at 3″. They’re so cute!

I forgot to mention last time that Patty came over for company while she stitched the binding on this quilt:

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One of my procrastination tasks was to prepare this block from Anna’s Blue Baskets/Jo’s Floral Album for applique.

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I made more border strip sets for T for Two like this:

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I might have enough of the narrow border pieces but I probably need to make one more set of the wide border.

Here are the two options for the top border.

I was originally picturing it with the version on the left. Linda suggested the version on the right. I think she’s right – I like that better now that I’ve seen it. I’m waiting to hear from my friend which one she likes since she’s the one who has to look at it. Next week I need to start getting the borders on so I can get the quilt to the long-armer and git ‘er done!

Still in procrastination mode, I decided it was time to add the cut scraps from Genie’s stash to mine. They were in a box in the storage room – 3 shoe boxes full of strips plus some loose stuff in the box. The 2.5″ strip box had mostly short strips. I took the strips that were long enough and paired them up for 16-patch blocks. The short strips were dumped into the string box. I got enough blocks for a kid quilt (In the Pink) plus 3 extra for my collection.

There were some sewn pieces in the scrap box as well which went into what I call the ABS (already been sewn or parts bin) bag. Linda likes to do improv piecing so I told her before she came over last week that her mission, should she choose to accept it was to take the ABS scraps. ABS scraps are anything that’s been sewn to at least one other piece of fabric. Might be half-square triangles, strip set, partial blocks, etc.

Then, while she was sorting them into piles of things that sort of go together, I shoved the pile of random scraps from Genie’s box and said, “take these, too.” Then I ran over and grabbed the pile of 2.5″ short strips from the string box and gave her those also. Hey, it’s rare for me to want to fling fabric out of here so I have to take advantage of my mood. By the time she finished sorting, she went home with two filled shoe boxes, a shopping bag and the bag the stuff was in when she started.

The 2″ and 3.5″ strips from Genie’s box went into my strip bins to await inspiration.

Circa 2012/2013 I made this bargello (I Used to Be a Layer Cake) wall hanging from a pattern and layer cake that I picked up at Linda’s store. I liked the fabric but didn’t want to buy yardage so this was the perfect solution to get a taste. It looks like spring to me. It’s been waiting for a back all these years.

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I had chosen a backing fabric that would only be big enough by doing the John Flynn diagonal seam back technique. Unfortunately, the fabric I chose was a stripe which meant that after the pieces were slid to make the width, the stripe would need to be matched. I finally decided that was a stupid choice and went with this fabric from my stash. The picture on the right shows the binding fabric.

The bargello piece went to the quilter yesterday. It was made from this pattern, layout #2.

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More string blocks were made.

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More leader-ender twosies . . .

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and foursies.IMG_20180926_171923.jpg

I can’t believe tomorrow is Friday already. Last Friday Patty, Linda and I met our friends Caren and Paul and Caren’s friend Carrie at the Baltimore Modern Guild’s bingo night. Everyone in the group won except me won a door prize. Patty won two bingo games. I’m happy for them but it’s always more fun when I win.

Tomorrow I go to my guild’s 3-day weekend retreat at Pecometh retreat center.

Stringing Along While Bordering on Boredom

September 14, 2018

September began with our monthly Sew & Tell meeting. Kathy showed what she’s been up to the last several months.

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Kathy’s yarmulkes for the princess’s upcoming Bat Mitzvah.

She had a lot of fun choosing the fabrics. Each one has a novelty print on one side and what she called a “sane” fabric (tone on tone) on the other side so the owner can wear it on the sober side if preferred. This one is really cute:

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Yarmulke with a llama wearing a yarmulke!

Kathy commissioned the shawl and other bits from a local maker. They’re hand-dyed silk and are absolutely gorgeous.

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I’ve been making string blocks.

Last time I touted my new tool for slicing the paper on the back of the blocks. Apparently I need to be more careful if I’m slitting the paper on the starting strip where I’ve used glue to “pin” it to the paper because this happened:

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Yup. I slit the fabric. Not the end of the world. Here’s what the back looks like at this point.

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I got out the ripper and removed the center strip. Then I sewed the two sides to a new strip.

I’m working on this for the border on T for Two. I love the look of the mirrored border print but it is painfully boring to prepare and sew. The prints have to be matched up and pinned a lot so the fabric doesn’t slip out of alignment. Then I stitch very slowly so I can stay on the line.

You might have noticed that the narrow border print isn’t actually mirrored because I am alternating the motifs. In the case of this border print, I felt it looked better to have the blue blob in the center of the one motif bounce from one side to the next instead of being lined up in lockstep.

I’ve got two of each stripe sewn so I’ve got 3 more sets of each to do to have sufficient length for the borders. Then the hard part comes. More about that when I get there.

While making strings I pulled some large half-square triangles out of the box. I decided to turn these into squares instead of cutting into strings and crumbs. They weren’t the same size but I just paired them up and used the smaller one as the guide for where to sew. I used my new triangle trimmer rulers to trim them.

What will I do with them? Who knows. For now, they’ve been added to the ABS (already been sewn) bag.

I finished the last leader-ender spool block so am now sewing green and white for a checkerboard quilt. They were already in pairs so now they’re being turned into 4-patches.

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Linda, Patty and I were supposed to go to the Pennsylvania National Quilt Extravaganza today. After checking the forecast on Monday evening, we decided to go yesterday instead because it looked like we were going to enjoy a weekend with rain from Hurricane Florence. By yesterday morning the forecast had changed but it was still a better day for going than today.

As with all the regional shows in this area, over the last several years we have noticed a decrease in the number of vendors and the contest quilts. Every year this show seems to add more special exhibits. There were some very good quilts but I found a lot of the quilts this year to be ho-hum. I went through all the quilts and vendors in record time. We arrived at 11:15 or so, ate lunch and Patty and I were ready to leave by 2 pm. We have never done a major show in that short a time. After we tracked Linda down, we left before 3 pm.

I was disgusted to see that First place in the Modern category went to a friggin’ panel quilt. Really? Don’t get me wrong. It was a pretty quilt and I liked it a lot but it was a panel with a pieced border. Not award worthy in a major regional show, in my opinion.

One of the special exhibits was Threads of Resistance. First time I’ve ever seen a quilt exhibit that was draped off from public view with warning signs at the entrance. Some of the quilts had a phone number to call to listen to an audio message about the piece. I didn’t take the time to do that. Some pieces were thought provoking, others too in your face for my taste but on the whole, the exhibit made me sad and depressed. Being confronted with the enormity of happenings the last two years brought me to tears.

I’m pleased to say I didn’t buy a single piece of fabric at this show. Nor did I buy any patterns. I did pick up a few things from Brooklyn Haberdashery, a new to me vendor.

Writing this post has allowed me to procrastinate on sewing more border print stripes together. 🙂